Author Topic: Sinus  (Read 31 times)

jordanm

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Sinus
« on: August 31, 2016, 12:17:47 pm »
Sinus - the Relationship Between Ear Infection and Sinusitis
Cold, allergies, coughing, and sneezing can all influence in sinusitis. However, the fact that these can be an influence in ear infection is not commonly known. The reason that sinusitis and ear infection are related is that the sinuses and the ear are connected by a tube in the inner ear called the Eustachian tube.

Also Works the Other Way Around
Infection in the ears can also drain down into the sinuses, inflaming the sinus tissue and causing sinusitis. It was at the spur of the moment that we ventured to write something about Sinusitis Ear. Such is the amount of matter that is available on Sinusitis Ear.

Both Sinusitis and Ear Infection are Surprisingly Simple to Prevent
Proper and frequent cleaning of the ears with Q-tips will prevent liquid from draining into the inner ear, inviting infection to settle in the Eustachian tube or other tissue. Preventing sinusitis is just as simple. Just as we wash our hands throughout the day to prevent bacteria and disease, we should wash out our nasal passages with nasal spray on a regular basis. This cleans out germs that enter the body through the mouth and nose. In using nasal spray, one should keep in mind that studies have shown xylitol to be a natural bacteria repellant that one should look for as the leading ingredient in nasal spray. Because it is sugar free, it also reduces the ability of bacteria to leave behind damaging acids.

Consider what happens when one having sinusitis blows his or her nose, coughs, or sneezes. Where does the air go? True, much of the air goes through the mouth and nose, but much of the air pressure goes out toward the ears. That means that infection is also pushed out toward the ears, making sinusitis an indirect cause of ear infection. We have written a humorous anecdote on Sinusitis to make it's reading more enjoyable and interesting to you. This way you learn there is a funny side to Sinusitis too!

Before explaining further how sinusitis and ear infection are connected, I will explain them one at a time, beginning with sinusitis, then moving on to ear infection. When one is suffering from the cold, flu, or allergies, there tends to be stuffiness in the sinuses. The stuffiness is caused by the sinuses. They produce mucous in an effort to clean the sinus tissue from the dirt and bacteria breathed in. Whenever the sinuses sense impurities or bacteria, they produce more mucous. Sometimes this is counterproductive, because the bacteria may settle in the sinus tissue and cause inflammation or sinusitis. The mucous then gets blocked in by the inflammation, and instead of cleaning out the bacteria, it invites bacteria to grow. We were furnished with so many points to include while writing about Sinusitis Ear Infection that we were actually lost as to which to use and which to discard!

After swimming, bathing, playing in the snow, or other water activities, water collects in the ears, and if it is not properly cleaned out, it drains into the Eustachian tube. Because the Eustachian tube is only slightly slanted, even less in children, the liquid often settles in the Eustachian tube, inviting ear infection. Similar to sinusitis, ear infection can inflame and swell, blocking further drainage. Ear infection can cause dizziness, headaches, ear aches, and other ailments. Sometimes, what we hear about Inflammation Sinusitis can prove to be rather hilarious and illogical. This is why we have introduced this side of Inflammation Sinusitis to you. :)

Here are Some Useful Tips to Bid Adieu to Acute Sinus Pain
First, let's analyze whether it is a chronic or a simple case of sinus. There are three major divisions of sinusitis - acute, sub-acute and chronic. Acute is basically bacterial in origin and lasts for less than four weeks, sub acute types last for four to twelve weeks, chronic more than 12 weeks. They are left over symptoms caused by cold or flu.

  • Conclusion  Finally it all boils down to having a healthy lifestyle.
  • Take ample supplements to stay healthy.
  • As recommended by researchers - Vitamin C: 1,000 to 2,000 mg. daily and Vitamin A: 10,000 I.U. daily can help you get rid of acute sinus pain. :)
Symptoms of Acute Sinus
See if you have the right symptoms of acute sinus pain, which include headache, fever, cough, postnasal drainage (yellow or green in colour), nasal congestion, hampered smell, facial pain, and change in body temperature, sever headache in the mornings are the symptoms we often find in this case.

Remedies  Drink lot of fluids it keeps the mucous flowing which is the first step to get rid of acute sinus pain. Drink at least six to eight glasses of water a day. Herbal tea and soups have an excellent effect.Steam your face for at least 20 to 30 minutes. Boil water in a bowl and add cold balm to it and put a towel on your head. Now inhale the vapour it gives you lot of relief.Blow your nose regularly.Allergy can also cause sinus for example a particular food, drink or inhalant. Sometime people are allergic to cockroaches too. So identify the allergen and find relief.Intake of Vitamin A and Vitamin C can aid in an infection. Vitamin A strengthens the immune system.N-acetylcysteine, a resultant of an amino acid, assists in sinus drain.Xanthium fruit and magnolia flower are used to clear nasal blocks according to a Chinese method.Herbs like nettle leaves in tea also reduce inflammation. We have included some fresh and interesting information on Acute Sinus. In this way, you are updated on the developments of Acute Sinus.

How many times have you heard someone say: "I think I'm coming down with a cold."? No doubt many times. In fact, most of us have'said that'or made'a similar statement, ourselves. Now a days when someone I know tells me that I usually reply: "Could it be allergies?" Because many of those "colds" are probably allergy reactions to the environment. As I look back to my childhood days one cannot, but wonder at the strong possibility that all those tablespoons of cod liver oil my mother faithfully administered----in their full natural flavor, as commonly done in those days--to prevent my getting a "cold," although not a bad idea'were probably unnecessary since'my frequent runny nose, coughing and'post nasal drip'were very likely'caused by allergens.'Even, perhaps, by'the thick smog'that'had developed in the large city I grew up in. :)

Several years went by and we moved farther North where carpets are more commonly used than in the Southwest and I began to once again have "cold" symptoms. At least that's what we thought at first. Since I was hardly using cow's milk and had resumed the allergy injections my wife'and I wondered, what could the cause of'the post nasal drip, etc.,'be this time. So I went back to an allergy specialist in our new area.'After doing some testing'he found'I was very allergic to house dust.'In the process of being given the allergy tests I found that not all house dust'is'created equal. Some dusts contain large amounts of dust mite droppings. This kind of'mites thrive in a humid and warm environment, like the one produced by the human body while lying in bed,'where the mites'eat mostly microscopic particles of human skin that rubs off there and on the carpet. The tests'did show'I was very allergic to that kind of house dust. Thereupon I was given minute instructions by my doctor'on how to shield my bed'from the'little varmints and their'droppings. The devastating allergic effects I was having'began to subside, especially when to my allergy injections was added the dust mite droppings antigen. So after reading what we have mentioned here on Sinusitis Post Nasal, it is up to you to provide your verdict as to what exactly it is that you find fascinating here.

As I studied my sinus problem several years ago, I came to the conclusion that the two main causes of my problem were: some foods'and environmental allergies. Whenever I indulged in a milk shake or a large serving of ice cream I had serious post nasal drip in a matter of hours. And whenever I had a large glass of cow's milk 3 or more days in a row I had the same result. I would stop drinking milk for several days or stop eating ice how to clear congested sinuses would clear up in just a few days. The seeming correlation became so obvious that I finally decided, a number of years ago, to stop using these food items on a regular basis and, of course, the sinuses cleared up indefinitely. Looking for something logical on Sinusitis Post Nasal Drip, we stumbled on the information provided here. Look out for anything illogical here.

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There can definitely be an allergy connection to'sinus pressure and other sinus problems. My case is not unique. If one is suffering from ongoing sinus problems it might not be a bad idea to consider testing for allergies to the environment and possibly foods, especially if your health insurance covers these tests.

Then came spring time and as weeds and their flowers, and trees and their own flowers made their appearance once again in our area, the same allergic reaction I had had to the foods already mentioned, above,'began to reappear, except that' I wasn't using them. So, it became obvious that I was allergic to certain pollens and probably other allergens. I had pollen allergy tests made and sure enough there were a number of pollens I was very allergic to. With these results on hand the only alternative I had was:'move to a place where there were not pollens I was allergic to--probably something rather impossible--or begin to receive allergy injections on a regular basis. I opted for the latter. Writing on Sinus Pressure proved to be a gamble to us. This is because there simply seemed to be nothing to write about in the beginning of writing. It was only in the process of writing did we get more and more to write on Sinus Pressure.

There are two main reasons why antibiotics don't work for sinus infections or sinusitis. Antibiotics have been routinely given for acute sinus infections for many years. Originally doctors prescribed them for seven days. When patients came back and still had the sinus infection the doctors increase the prescription to ten days.

Antibiotics Don't Heal by the Way
It's the body that heals.  The truth is that most sinus infections are cause by a fungus, usually a common household mold called aspergillus. The aspergillus fungus is airborne and is just about everywhere in any household. There will be higher concentrations in bathrooms and any room that has a lot of moisture. Sometimes the mold in bathroom is obvious and sometimes it's not. Isn't it wonderful that we can now access information about anything, including Chronic Sinus form the Internet without the hassle of going through books and magazines for matter!

Even Several Years Ago the U
S. Physicians Group issued a statement advising doctors not to prescribe antibiotics for sinus infections. Unfortunately recent research has shown that doctors prescribe a sinus medicine, medication or drug because they want to appease the patient and not just for sinus problems. This can be for many ailments and conditions with symptoms they have no immediate solution for. The more you read about Sinus Infections, the more you get to understand the meaning of it. So if you read this article and other related articles, you are sure to get the required amount of matter for yourself


Sinus-Tachycardia


A sinus infection is not treated with antibiotics or other sinus medications most of the time the sinusitis would resolve on its own anyway within two to three weeks. In some cases of long antibiotic therapy when the problem did resolve it was credited to the antibiotic when the body did the healing.

The unfortunate part of this is that the patient now has one or more allergies to antibiotics so they cannot be used in the future for life-threatening conditions, if needed. When doing an assignment on Chronic Sinus Infection, it is always better to look up and use matter like the one given here. Your assignment turns out to be more interesting and colorful this way.

These are Two of the Reasons Why Antibiotics Won't Work for Sinus Infections
Another problem with taking antibiotics is the side effects, adverse reactions and other risks you have taking them or for any drug for that matter. Natural remedies and natural solutions are always the best sinus treatment and there are plenty that work for sinus infections, sinusitis, pain, pressure, ear pressure, headaches, blockage and other sinus problems. Learning about things is what we are living here for now. So try to get to know as much about everything, including Sinus Headaches whenever possible.

  • Another reason antibiotics don't work for sinus infections is that the antibiotic cannot reach the four sets of sinus cavities.
  • The sinus cavities are located in such a way that the antibiotics cannot move through the blood supply to reach them.
  • So even if your sinus infection was bacterial in origin it would be hard for the antibiotic to get to it.
  • People always think that they know everything about everything; however, it should be known that no one is perfect in everything.
  • There is never a limit to learning; even learning about Sinus Medicine.
The Most Common Antibiotic that is Used for Sinus Infections is Amoxicillin
Amoxicillin is synthetic penicillin. Usually people who are allergic to penicillin can't take Amoxicillin. Erythromycin is another that has been used much in the past. The best way of gaining knowledge about Sinus Treatment is by reading as much about it as possible. This can be best done through the Internet.

More Than 90% of Sinus Infections are Caused by this Fungus or Mold
If you suffer from sinus infections you want to get rid of any mold in your house. Even small amounts in the bathroom around the bathtub or shower or inside the upper toilet bowl. Look around the window sills. Look around the bathroom and get rid of it fast. Be careful to make sure your mouth and nose are covered with a mask for protection.

When that didn't work the patient would give up or they would start all over with another course of antibiotics or try a different antibiotic like erythromycin or amoxicillin for example. And there are adverse reactions and side effects to consider, for example, with amoxicillin such as an upset stomach, vomiting, and diarrhea. This article will help you since it is a comprehensive study treatment for chronic sinus infection

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